Wednesday, September 15, 2010

Green Choices Wednesday - Using Your Local Library

Just a simple choice to note today.

Yesterday, I went to our local library branch (only one mile from the house, close enough to run to!), and picked up a library card.  Most environmentally aware people realize that it's greener to read books from the library instead of buying them.  We read most books once, and then they adorn our bookshelves for eternity.  Library books are reused over and over.  There are a few books that are special to us, and we want to re-read them, periodically or even frequently.  Other books may have a smaller readership demand, and the library may not carry them.  Those are  good reasons to buy books.  So, when there's a book I want to read, I'll check the library first. 

I had intended to get a library card since I moved to a different city near the end of last year, but put it off.  This week I read a book review on Callah's "My Yoga Life" blog: my yoga life: The World We Have (a book review), and the book contains an "Earth Peace Treaty" at the end of the book. It's basically a list of possible Earth-friendly activities to which one may choose to commit.  I like lists like this, because I get ideas from them.  Sometimes they are new ideas, and sometimes serve more as reminders that I may want to adopt an activity I'd been considering.  One item on the list was "Use library instead of buying books, as much as possible."  In this case, the list helped to motivate me to overcome my tendency to procrastinate.

My next challenge: develop a plan to overcome procrastination.  Maybe I'll do that tomorrow...

7 comments:

Stephanie said...

What do you think of an ipad instead of books at all? I must say though - I am turned off by all the electronic devices that come with people everywhere.

Barely read books, and if, it's most likely a running book.

Vern said...

Stephanie, I hadn't thought much about it before, but I think an electronic book reader like ipad or Kindle could be a good green option for one who reads a lot. For a heavy reader, I think the manufacture of the reading device would be more than offset by reduced manufacturing of books over the lifetime of the reading device. For an occasional reader, the actual paper book may consume less resources. There's got to be a break-even point somewhere, depending on amount one reads and the expected lifetime of the reading device.

elaine said...

To me, there's nothing like exploring a book section in a library or a used bookstore (another Green idea). An artful or thought-provoking display might lead you to pick up a book you might never consider otherwise. I see a future for electronic devices, but when their life is over, it is up to the owner to dispose of them in a responsible way. And thanks for visiting my blog!

♥ Callah said...

thanks for the mention! I just recently started going to the library again after kind of "forgetting" for a years- i was caught up in consumerism! it's so nice when a book you aren't expecting is actually there- DVDs too!

Vern said...

Elaine, good point on responsible disposal of electronic devices. We hope they are recycled properly, but know that many are not. A library is a fun place to just browse! And patronizing used bookstores is also a great green tip!

Callah, yes the library is a great resource! Of course, they don't always have the book one wants. I wanted to re-read Iyengar's "Light on Life," and they didn't have it. I was a little disappointed, but they may be able to get it through an inter-library exchange program.

Don said...

As a lifelong collector/hoarder of books, I've been struggling with the idea of what to do with the (at least) 1,200 books I own. At one time, they were my prized possessions, but now, after having to move them from home to home, they have become more of a burden than a treasure.

Did you know you can download a free reader to your computer rather than buying a separate device? Today's notebook computers are light enough to carry around and travel with, and you can do a lot more with them than you can with a Kindle or an iPad.

Vern said...

That's a good option, Don. Owners of notebook computers could use it like an electronic reader without buying and additional device.